Compulsory Irish has failed in the Republic, at huge cost to taxpayers

 

 

 

 

 

The ideological training of a country’s children through language enforcement was tried in the Republic of Ireland; now this policy is to be foisted on the people of Northern Ireland. Robin Bury considers the history of this attempt to reprogramme an English-speaking people, the great cost, its underlying ideology, and why it will fail again in the future.

Robin Bury, 8 July 2017, News Letter > Read full News Letter article here

Also > Belfast Telegraph: If you want to see true cost of an Irish Language Act, look to Canada

Image: newsletter.co.uk

Re-enter the Commonwealth by Mary Kenny

Article by Mary Kenny on why Ireland should re-enter the Commonwealth in the context of Brexit.

It left in 1949, not 1948. Australian Foreign Affairs Minister was very helpful in negotiating an exit with Attlee that would ensure Eire would get free movement of labour and trade benefits it enjoyed as a Commonwealth member. Canada also treated Eire as a Commonwealth member after it left. This led Churchill to say “When they were in they were out and when they were out they were in.’ It was like having your cake and eating it.

Independent.ie > Read more

Reform Group Seminar (15 October 2016)

Mr John Bruton, former taoiseach (prime minister) of the Republic of Ireland and former European Union ambassador to the United States of America

Mr Frank Callanan S.C. (author of the Parnell split and T.M. Healy)

Mr Dermot Meleady (author of two volumes on the life of John Redmond)

Mr Tom Carew (local historian)

Chairman: Mr Felix Larkin

Forgotten Patriots seminar available on iTunes along with other talks, and available on SoundCloud

A wealth in common with the UK

It is encouraging to see Tom Cooper (Letters, April 28) entering the debate on Ireland joining the Commonwealth. The Reform Group has promoted this debate on its website (reform.org).

It is regrettable that Mr Cooper suggests membership would lead to the ‘re-Britishing’ of this country. This is not the experience of the 52 members of the Commonwealth, 32 of which are sovereign republics.

The Commonwealth ceased to be Anglo-centric in 1949, when its name was changed from the British Commonwealth. We played a role in this process. The Commonwealth was formed by leaders of national liberation movements, such as Nehru (India), Nyerere (Tanzania), Kuanda (Zambia), and Mandela (South Africa), who brought his country back to the Commonwealth after independence.

The key figure in the Commonwealth is the Secretary-General, not Queen Elizabeth, who is the symbolic head. Queen Elizabeth has no authority to interfere in the affairs of Commonwealth countries.

The Secretary-General carries out the policies of heads of government in promoting democracy, human rights, equality, aid and the rule of law, all in line with the policies of our government.

Benefits include the “impact on trade, environment, and social and economic stability”, to cite the recent words of the Secretary-General, Kamalesh Sharma.

Reform would argue it is surprising we are not already a member, as the ties between the UK and Ireland have been profoundly strong over the span of history. Many thousands of Irish people move to the UK every year.

About 25% of the British population has some Irish heritage. We share identities, cultures, faiths, language, profession, political and legal structures and, of course, trade on a large scale. Some Commonwealth countries give, and have given, hope and new lives to our youth, providing a safety valve for our unemployed.

Let’s not forget Irish people played a major role in building the Commonwealth at all levels. Mr Cooper’s views about the Commonwealth sadly suggest an insecurity about our relationship with the UK, rather than confidently embracing our independence, while expressing our shared identity within the Commonwealth.

Robin Bury
Chairman
The Reform Group
Military Road
Killiney
Co Dublin

Irish Examiner – Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Nelson Mandela and the Commonwealth

Posted by Verity Sharp – Royal Commonwealth Society
6th December 2013

It is with sadness that the Royal Commonwealth Society joins South Africa and the international community in mourning the loss of Nelson Mandela. The Commonwealth has lost an extraordinary and inspirational champion of the values that are its strength. He will be remembered for his innate dignity, his compassion and his unbounded capacity to draw a quality of forgiveness out of hatred.

As we reflect on Mandela’s passing, many Commonwealth commentators will remember the association’s opposition of the apartheid movement, and its support for inclusive democratic elections in South Africa as its finest hour.

> Read more

Image: Nelson Mandela at the Royal Commonwealth Society