Compulsory Irish has failed in the Republic, at huge cost to taxpayers

 

 

 

 

 

The ideological training of a country’s children through language enforcement was tried in the Republic of Ireland; now this policy is to be foisted on the people of Northern Ireland. Robin Bury considers the history of this attempt to reprogramme an English-speaking people, the great cost, its underlying ideology, and why it will fail again in the future.

Robin Bury, 8 July 2017, News Letter > Read full News Letter article here

Also > Belfast Telegraph: If you want to see true cost of an Irish Language Act, look to Canada

Image: newsletter.co.uk

Changes to the Common Travel Area inevitable?

We must understand the serious implications of Brexit for freedom of movement on this island, and among these islands, if we are not to return to the borders of the past.

Siobhan Mullally writes about these implications of Brexit in the Irish Times, and warns of its possible inevitability. Since this issue touches on issues of freedom of movement, and of citizenship, it ultimately may effect the parity of esteem of all the peoples who inhabit our islands and nations, our common home—both those who have been here for a long time, and those who are new to these shores.

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A recent article by Brian Walker in the ‘Slugger O’Toole’ website examines another issue which may come into focus as a result of Brexit if we are to avoid a ‘hard border’, the issue of citizenship, and whether the concept of some kind of common citizenship options across these islands is something which perhaps needs to be considered. Could it be that in these Brexit times, acquiring dual citizenship (where possible) is the only way to remain British, Irish, and European?

> Read more

Image: The Irish Times

Economics: institutions, borders, norms and sentiments do matter

Tom Healy, Director NERI

by Tom Healy, Director NERI (Nevin Economic Research Institute)

There are only five ways to avoid a further hardening of the border on the island of Ireland:

  1. The United Kingdom does not leave the EU – after all.
  2. A united Ireland within the UK and outside the EU is agreed.
  3. A united Ireland outside the UK and within the EU is agreed.
  4. The EU breaks up and/or there is an Irexit in which case Ireland and the UK are free to negotiate whatever bilateral arrangements suit them.
  5. Some special status is agreed whereby Northern Ireland remains within the EU and the UK.

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We must acknowledge British soldiers killed in the Rising

Republic owes it itself to engage with history in all of its complexity and nuance

As many as 125 soldiers of the British army died during the Easter Rising. They came from every part of Ireland, as well as England,Wales, Scotland and further afield. Men from Kilkenny and Armagh fought alongside those from Nottinghamshire and Staffordshire.

Image: Grangegorman Military Cemetary, Dublin