DUP leader delivers Brexit message at Killarney conference

Arlene Foster, leader of Northern Ireland’s Democratic Unionist party puts forward a nuanced vision of the future of these Isles at a recent Killarney conference. Could the “nordic” model, where close co-operation exists between countries, some of which are inside, and some of which are outside the EU work in the case of the UK and Republic of Ireland? Is there a greater future for the British-Irish Council? Do our common institutions, the North-South institutions, but also crucially the East-West dimension, such as the Common Travel Area and other harmonising strategies be the way forward for these islands, our common home in the north Atlantic?

“Whilst the referendum was a vote by the British people, the ripples that flow from the referendum result will be far reaching with long-term implications for people well beyond the shores of the United Kingdom. And I appreciate and understand that nowhere will be more impacted by the United Kingdom’s exit from the European Union than Ireland.”

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Image: Killarney National Park website

Joining the Commonwealth would help address the Brexit conundrum

writes Dan O’Brien, Irish Independent, 29 Oct 2017.

Underpinning Irish foreign policy is a belief in an open, free-trading world supported by international institutions with solid rules-based foundations. The concrete expression of this posture is membership of a whole array of international organisations.

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Image: Alamy.com

Reform Group Seminar (15 October 2016)

Mr John Bruton, former taoiseach (prime minister) of the Republic of Ireland and former European Union ambassador to the United States of America

Mr Frank Callanan S.C. (author of the Parnell split and T.M. Healy)

Mr Dermot Meleady (author of two volumes on the life of John Redmond)

Mr Tom Carew (local historian)

Chairman: Mr Felix Larkin

Forgotten Patriots seminar available on iTunes along with other talks, and available on SoundCloud

We must acknowledge British soldiers killed in the Rising

Republic owes it itself to engage with history in all of its complexity and nuance

As many as 125 soldiers of the British army died during the Easter Rising. They came from every part of Ireland, as well as England,Wales, Scotland and further afield. Men from Kilkenny and Armagh fought alongside those from Nottinghamshire and Staffordshire.

Image: Grangegorman Military Cemetary, Dublin

Diljit Rana urges Republic to consider rejoining Commonwealth

Ronan McGreevy – Irish Times – 17 April 2015

The Republic needs to have a “rational and serious debate” about rejoining the Commonwealth, a member of the House of Lords has said.

Speaking at the launch of the first branch of the Royal Commonwealth Society (RCS) in the Republic, Indian-born entrepreneur Lord Diljit Rana said any debate must not be “governed by historical distortion, but rather recognise the truth of today and recognise that the Republic of Ireland has much to offer and lots to receive.”

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> Lord Rana’s “Commonwealth plea to Republic”